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Memory Strategy Instruction with the Elderly: What Should Memory Training be the Training of?

  • Pamela Roberts
Part of the Springer Series in Cognitive Development book series (SSCOG)

Abstract

The research literature on providing memory strategies for the elderly is very new and incomplete. Most of the research on memory functioning in the elderly has focused on the explanation and locus of memory decline with age. Although a large body of literature on memory functioning in late adulthood now exists, issues concerning the extent, cause, and prevention of the decline are still vigorously debated (see Poon, Fozard, Cermak, Arenberg, & Thompson, 1980). Thus, one impediment in this research area has been the question: What should memory training be the training of (and can it work)?

Keywords

Elderly Subject Visual Imagery Fluid Intelligence Memory Training Secondary Memory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pamela Roberts

There are no affiliations available

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