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Information Content of Urodynamics

  • Otis L. Updike

Abstract

Clinical urodynamics involves the application of hydrodynamic principles and techniques to the diagnosis of disorders of the urinary tract (and to the planning of appropriate therapy). A major example is identification and localization of stenoses in the vesicourethral channel. Here hydrodynamic principles provide models by which data on observable variables are evaluated and interpreted; further, they allow the urologist to infer values of variables that are not readily or reliably observable.

Keywords

Pressure Profile Transverse Velocity Viscous Friction Benign Prostatic Hypertrophy Velocity Head 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1983

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  • Otis L. Updike

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