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Soil degradation studies

  • D. A. Laskowski
  • R. L. Swann
  • P. J. McCall
  • H. D. Bidlack
Part of the Residue Reviews book series (RECT, volume 85)

Abstract

The April 22, 1981 draft of the Environmental Protection Agency Guidelines (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 1981) emphasizes metabolism aspects of soil studies. The intent is to identify breakdown products that might accumulate in soil. A single soil is recommended; it must represent the soil at intended application sites.

Keywords

Environmental Fate Soil Study Central Composite Factorial Design Generate Rate Data Environmental Protection Agency Guideline 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. A. Laskowski
    • 1
  • R. L. Swann
    • 1
  • P. J. McCall
    • 1
  • H. D. Bidlack
    • 1
  1. 1.Agricultural Products Dept.The Dow Chemical CompanyMidlandUSA

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