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Responses of Heterotrophs

  • J. L. Leetham
  • W. K. Lauenroth
  • D. G. Milchunas
  • T. Kirchner
  • T. P. Yorks
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 45)

Abstract

Heterotrophs play a direct and indirect role in the structural development and functional processes of a system (O’Neill, 1976; Lee and Inman, 1975; Kitchell et al., 1979). As consumers they are a channel of energy and nutrient flow and thus directly influence the functioning of the system. They indirectly affect the functioning of the system in a role as rate regulators and substrate transformers and transporters. Through other various activities they may modify the physical environment which in turn indirectly affects the functioning of the system. The response of plants to consumers can have an influence on the structure of the system.

Keywords

Invertebrate Community Trophic Group Forage Quality Cellulose Digestion Nymphal Instar 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. L. Leetham
  • W. K. Lauenroth
  • D. G. Milchunas
  • T. Kirchner
  • T. P. Yorks

There are no affiliations available

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