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Survey of Pheromone Uses in Pest Control

  • D. G. Campion
Part of the Springer Series in Experimental Entomology book series (SSEXP)

Abstract

Pheromones are chemicals produced by one organism which influence the behavior of other members of the same species. Chemical communication of this kind is well established among insects. The two classes of pheromones most exploited in pest control situations are the sex pheromones employed by insects during mating and the aggregation pheromones which bring both sexes together for feeding and reproduction.

Keywords

Trap Density Pheromone Trap Mating Disruption Pink Bollworm Cotton Pest 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. G. Campion
    • 1
  1. 1.Tropical Development and Research InstituteLondonUK

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