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Techniques for Purifying, Analyzing, and Identifying Pheromones

  • R. R. Heath
  • J. H. Tumlinson
Part of the Springer Series in Experimental Entomology book series (SSEXP)

Abstract

“The ultimate practical goal of pheromone research on insect pests is to place the communication system on a molecular basis and to use the knowledge to detect, survey, trap, or disrupt the population” (Silverstein, 1982). Achievement of this goal requires the combined efforts of entomologists working in behavior and ecology and analytical and synthetic organic chemists. Analytical chemistry is the indispensable link between field ecology, the observation of pheromone induced behavior, and the development of a bioassay on one hand and field application of the synthesized pheromone on the other. Thus the success of a pheromone project often depends on the proper selection of analytical procedures for isolation and identification of the biologically active compound (s) and for evaluation of the purity and structural congruity of the synthesized pheromone.

Keywords

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Liquid Crystal Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Geometrical Isomer Column Efficiency 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. R. Heath
    • 1
  • J. H. Tumlinson
    • 1
  1. 1.Insect Attractants, Behavior, and Basic Biology Research LaboratoryAgricultural Research Service, USDAGainesvilleUSA

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