Growth Activation in Adult Rat Hepatocytes

  • N. L. R. Bucher
  • W. E. Russell
  • J. A. McGowan
Chapter
Part of the Experimental Biology and Medicine book series (EBAM, volume 5)

Abstract

The hepatocytes in normal adult rats are in a state of quiescence, or G0. They retain the capacity to proliferate, however, and re-enter the cell cycle in partial synchrony, responding vigorously to 2/3 hepatectomy and slightly less so to manipulations of the diet, administration of hormones, growth factors, toxic agents, and other substances. The precise physiological signals that regulate this growth remain elusive, but evidence from a number of laboratories indicates that blood-borne substances are responsible (1).

Keywords

Filtration Carbohydrate Lactate Recombination Agarose 

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References

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Copyright information

© The Humana Press Inc. 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. L. R. Bucher
    • 1
  • W. E. Russell
    • 2
  • J. A. McGowan
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PathologyBoston University School of MedicineBostonUSA
  2. 2.Childrens Service, Shriners Burns Institute and MassGeneral HospitalBostonUSA

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