Benign Gastric Lesions

  • Jon A. van Heerden
Part of the Comprehensive Manuals of Surgical Specialties book series (CMSS)

Abstract

Attention to stress ulceration was first popularized with the description of duodenal ulceration occurring in conjunction with lesions of the central nervous system (Cushing’s ulcer) or in patients with massive burns (Curling’s ulcer). The causes of this ulceration are, however, multifactorial; they include not only lesions of the central nervous system and burns but also sepsis of any cause or magnitude; hypotension; cardiac, hepatic, or renal failure; pulmonary insufficiency; and the administration of corticosteroids. Most stress ulcers are multiple, diffuse, and superficial.

Keywords

Corticosteroid Titration Cimetidine Gastritis Lipoma 

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References

Stress Ulceration

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jon A. van Heerden

There are no affiliations available

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