Language and Social Situations: An Introductory Review

  • Joseph P. Forgas
Part of the Springer Series in Social Psychology book series (SSSOC)

Abstract

This book is about the role that common social situations play in the way people use language in everyday life. Verbal communication is the essence of social interaction: Most of our encounters consist of talk. Exchanging greetings and morning pleasantries with your colleagues at the office, discussing the price of meat with a familiar shop assistant, or asking your children about the day’s events at school are examples of recurring verbal exchanges that are almost completely routinized.

Keywords

Production Line Tempo Lewin 

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© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1985

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  • Joseph P. Forgas

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