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Immunologic Methods of Diagnostic and Prognostic Value in Tumor Bearers

  • Kenneth J. McCormick
Part of the Advances in Immunity and Cancer Therapy book series (IMMUNITY, volume 1)

Abstract

Cancer patients, especially those with clinically advanced disease, have demonstrated a variety of immunologic dysfunctions. However, it has not been possible to relate this multiplicity of abnormalities to a primary causal relationship with the host’s tumor. Although many reports have linked immune dysfunction to advanced stages of disease, the wealth of conflicting results in studies from various institutions has made it difficult to obtain data that are meaningful to the clinician.

Keywords

Clinical Immunology Raji Cell Prostatic Acid Phosphatase Tumor Bearer Cancer Immunol 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1985

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  • Kenneth J. McCormick

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