Introduction

  • Perry O. Roehl
  • Philip W. Choquette
Part of the Casebooks in Earth Sciences book series (CASEBOOKS)

Abstract

Although carbonate reservoirs have been important contributors to world oil and gas production for several decades, their importance has increased dramatically as a result of sharp changes in world demand in conjunction with restricted geopolitical locations of many of the truly giant carbonate fields. In a survey of 266 giant oil and gas fields with recoverable reserves of 500 million barrels equivalent or more discovered through 1967, Halbouty et al (1970) cite 116 fields, or 44 percent, that produce substantially or entirely from carbonate reservoirs. A review of the statistics suggests that these carbonate reservoirs contain about 61 percent of the recoverable oil in giant fields.

Keywords

Porosity Petroleum Compaction Holocene Stratigraphy 

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© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Perry O. Roehl
  • Philip W. Choquette

There are no affiliations available

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