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Psycholinguistic Aspects of Reading Disabilities

  • Linda S. Siegel
Part of the Springer Series in Cognitive Development book series (SSCOG)

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to explore the hypothesis that reading disabilities represent a disorder whose basis is inadequate language skills. Before presenting the arguments for this position, it is important to define what a reading disability is and what it is not. Chaos exists in the definition of reading and reading disability. There are many diverse viewpoints about what constitutes reading behavior and reading disabilities. The study of development of normal and atypical aspects of reading in children has been hampered by a lack of precise definitions. In this chapter I will attempt to develop a useful definition of reading disability and discuss the evidence for considering a reading disability as a disorder of deficient linguistic skills.

Keywords

Reading Comprehension Poor Reader Reading Disability Developmental Dyslexic Phonological Code 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1985

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  • Linda S. Siegel

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