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Acquiring and Using Words to Express Logical Relationships

  • Lucia A. French
Part of the Springer Series in Cognitive Development book series (SSCOG)

Abstract

This chapter considers children’s understanding of a small set of terms (before, after, because, so, if, but, and or) that function to express relationships between propositions. Because these terms permit the linguistic expression of the logical structures central to human cognition, their acquisition has been of concern to investigators with a variety of interests, including language acquisition, the development of logical reasoning, and general cognitive development. Understanding how these terms are acquired ultimately contributes to our knowledge of the relationships among language, logic, and cognitive development by indicating the ways in which nonlinguistic representations are integrated with linguistic knowledge to produce descriptions of logical relationships.

Keywords

Relational Term Contextual Model Logical Relationship Experimental Child Psychology Lexical Knowledge 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1986

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  • Lucia A. French

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