Presence of Gonadotropic and Prothoracicotropic Factors in Pupal and Adult Heads of Mosquitoes

  • LaVern R. Whisenton
  • Walter E. Bollenbacher
Part of the Experimental and Clinical Neuroscience book series (ECN)

Abstract

During insect posteiribyronic development, ecdysteroids stimulate the molecular events in target tissues that culminate in molting and metamorphosis (Bollenbacher and Granger, 1985). The cerebral peptide prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH) regulates the hemolymph titer of ecdysteroids through its activation of the prothoracic glands to synthesize ecdysone. In recent years, insect reproduction has been shown to be controlled by ecdysteroids as well. This is a surprising finding considering that in adult insects the prothoracic glands are absent (see Hagedorn, 1985). The role of ecdysteroids in insect reproduction has been most extensively investigated in the mosquito, Aedes aegypti, where the cerebral peptide egg development neurosecretory hormone (EDNH) stimulates the ovaries to synthesize ecdysone (Hagedorn et al., 1979). This results in an increased hemolymph eodysteroid titer which evokes vitellogenesis and ovary maturation.

Keywords

Beach Kelly Ecdysone 

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References

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Copyright information

© The Humana Press Inc. 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • LaVern R. Whisenton
    • 1
  • Walter E. Bollenbacher
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiologyUniversity of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA

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