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Assessing Drugs for Abuse Liability and Dependence Potential in Laboratory Primates

  • J. V. Brady
  • R. R. Griffiths
  • R. D. Hienz
  • N. A. Ator
  • S. E. Lukas
  • R. J. Lamb

Abstract

Distinctions between abuse liability and dependence potential are developed within the context of an assessment approach focusing upon the reinforcing, discriminative, and eliciting properties of drugs as the basis for an effective technology to evaluate a broad range of pharmacological agents. Procedures and outcomes from extensive studies with primates assessing drug self-administration, drug discrimination, physiological dependence, and behavioral toxicity are described and discussed.

Keywords

Dependence Potential Discriminative Stimulus Effect Drug Discrimination Abuse Liability Cocaine Dose 
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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. V. Brady
    • 1
  • R. R. Griffiths
    • 1
  • R. D. Hienz
    • 1
  • N. A. Ator
    • 1
  • S. E. Lukas
    • 1
  • R. J. Lamb
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesThe Johns Hopkins University School of MedicineBaltimoreUSA

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