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Information Processing Theory for the Survey Researcher

  • Reid Hastie
Part of the Recent Research in Psychology book series (PSYCHOLOGY)

Abstract

Psychology in the second half of the twentieth century is dominated by the cognitive point of view. Based on foundational work by Chomsky (1957) on syntactic structures in language, by Newell and Simon (1972) on computer simulation of thinking, and by a host of researchers interested in memory and perception (Miller, Galanter, & Pribram, 1960; Neisser, 1967), a new mentalism has emerged that serves as the central theoretical orientation in all subfields of psychology. Neighboring social sciences have started to use some of these theoretical concepts in their analyses of individual behavior.

Keywords

Information Processing Knowledge Structure Social Information Processing Information Processing Model Symbol Structure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Reid Hastie
    • 1
  1. 1.Northwestern UniversityEvanstonUSA

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