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Low Vision pp 288-307 | Cite as

Contrast Polarity Effects in Low Vision Reading

  • Gordon E. Legge
  • Gary S. Rubin
  • Mary M. Schleske

Abstract

Nearly all books, magazines and newspapers are printed with black letters on a white background. As Fig. 1 illustrates, it is possible to display text as white letters on a black background. We refer to these alternatives - black-on-white or white-on-black - as the contrast polarity of the text. Although the choice of contrast polarity has little effect on the reading performance of normally sighted people, it is important for some individuals with low vision.

Keywords

Normal Vision Reading Speed Reading Rate Contrast Polarity Character Size 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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    G.E. Legge, G.S. Rubin, D.G. Pelli, M.M. Schleske: Psychophysics of reading n. Low vision. Vision Res. 25, 253 (1985)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gordon E. Legge
  • Gary S. Rubin
  • Mary M. Schleske

There are no affiliations available

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