Advertisement

An Overview Of Ergonomics And Human Factors

  • Leonard S. Mark
  • Joel S. Warm
  • Ronald L. Huston
Part of the Recent Research in Psychology book series (PSYCHOLOGY)

Abstract

Many important developments in the human factors enterprise occurred during the Second World War with the deployment of new military technology, such as high-performance aircraft (Christensen, 1958). The use of such airplanes provided tremendous opportunities and challenges. But its promise and effectiveness was tempered severely by numerous problems. For example, it took more than two years of training to prepare a pilot to fly one of the larger planes. Many trainees were unable to master the many steps along the way; often these trainees had accidents resulting in the loss of lives and equipment. Flight training was a costly, time-consuming endeavor, given the relatively low percentage of pilot trainees who would graduate to combat roles.

Keywords

Applied Research Human Factor Human Ability Paper Session Engineering Design Process 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Adams, J. (1972). Research and the future of engineering psychology. American Psychologist. 27, 615–622.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Boies, S. J., Gould, J. D., Levy, S., Richards, J. T., & Schoonard, J. (1985). The 1984 Olympic Message System—A Case Study in Systems Design. Research Report, IBM Research Division, 1985.Google Scholar
  3. Christensen, J. M. (1958). Trends in human factors. Human Factors. 1, 2–7.Google Scholar
  4. Gibson, E. J. (1969). Principles of perceptual learning and development. New York: Appleton-Century-Crofts.Google Scholar
  5. Gibson, J. J. (1966). The senses considered as perceptual systems. Boston: Houghton-Mifflin.Google Scholar
  6. Gibson, J. J. (1979). The ecological approach to visual perception. Hillsdale, New Jersey: Erlbaum Associates.Google Scholar
  7. Grandjean, E. (1982). Fitting the task to the man. London: Taylor & Francis.Google Scholar
  8. Kantowitz, B. H., & Sorkin, R. D. (1983) Human factor: Understanding people-system relationships. New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
  9. Loellbaeh, H. (Ed.) (1968). Technology in retrospect and critical events in science (TRACES). National Science Foundation Contract NSF-C535, Vol. 1. Chicago: Illinois Institute of Technology Research Institute.Google Scholar
  10. Loellbaeh, H. (Ed.) (1969). Technology in retrospect and critical events in science (TRACES). National Science Foundation Contract NSF-C535, Vol. 2. Chicago: Illinois Institute of Technology Research Institute.Google Scholar
  11. Martin, O. E. & Alluisi, E. A. (1963, June). Quantification in human factors design. Paper presented at the American Society for Engineering Education, Philadelphia, PA.Google Scholar
  12. Meister, D. (1985). The two worlds of human factors. In R. E. Eberts & C. G. Eberts (Eds.) Trends in ergonomics and human factors II. Amsterdam: North-Holland.Google Scholar
  13. Wiener, N. (1948). Cybernetics. New York: Wiley.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leonard S. Mark
    • 1
  • Joel S. Warm
    • 2
  • Ronald L. Huston
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Psychology and Center for Ergonomics ResearchMiami UniversityOxfordUK
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of CincinnatiCincinnatiUSA
  3. 3.Department of Mechanical and Industrial EngineeringUniversity of CincinnatiCincinnatiUSA

Personalised recommendations