Soil-Borne Viruses of Plants

  • Chuji Hiruki
  • David S. Teakle
Part of the Current Topics in Vector Research book series (VECTOR, volume 3)

Abstract

A virus is soil-borne if it infects plants via soil. This may occur either through the activity of a soil-borne vector or by mechanical means, and usually this implies virus transmission to the underground parts of plants. However, if leaves or other aerial parts were infected following contact with soil (2), this would also be included. Viruses excluded from this definition are those transmitted by direct root-to-root contact, such as potato virus X (111) and cucumber mosaic virus (147), or root grafts, such as apple mosaic virus (61). Thus, to be soil-borne, a virus should have an existence in soil outside of a living host plant.

Keywords

Clay Chrome Europe Steam Recombination 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chuji Hiruki
    • 1
  • David S. Teakle
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Plant ScienceUniversity of AlbertaEdmontonCanada
  2. 2.Department of MicrobiologyUniversity of QueenslandSt. Lucia, BrisbaneAustralia

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