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Imagery and Memory in the Blind: A Review

  • Carole H. Ernest

Abstract

This chapter reflects the position that the examination of individual or group differences is useful in determining the limits and limitations of human cognitive functioning. This selective review of the literature on imagery and memory in the blind was motivated by three broad questions. First, in the absence of vision, and presumably visual images, are congenitally or early-blind individuals disadvantaged on learning and memory tasks presumed to require visual-imaginal processes? Second, given some investigators’ definition of imagery ability as visuospatial skill (see Ernest, 1977), can forms or shapes and information about their spatial orientation be processed or remembered as well by those lacking visual experience as those with it? Finally, do the blind compensate for their lack of vision by developing nonvisually based strategies or skills (e.g., auditory, tactile, haptic, self-referent) as aids to memory?

Keywords

Mental Rotation Motor Imagery Visual Experience Visual Imagery Abstract Word 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1987

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  • Carole H. Ernest

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