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Mammalian Neurokinins: Structure-Activity Study of the N- and C- Terminals

  • G. Drapeau
  • P. Rovero
  • P. D’Orleans-Juste
  • S. Dion
  • N. E. Rhaleb
  • D. Regoli
Conference paper

Abstract

The analysis of the primary structures of three neurokinins, namely neurokinin P (NKP), neurokinin A (NKA) and neurokinin B (NKB) reveals not only major differences in the chemical structure of these peptides at their N-terminal region but also striking similarities of their carboxyl extremities. The N-terminal major difference is represented by the presence of two positively charged residues (ArgI and Lys3) in NKP while NKA contains only one such residue (Lys2) and NKB has none. The C-terminal extremities of the three neurokinins are very similar since all contain the tripeptide Gly-Leu-Met-NH2.

Keywords

Free Acid Hydrogen Fluoride Meet Residue Methionine Sulfoxide Sulfone Derivative 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Drapeau
    • 1
  • P. Rovero
    • 1
  • P. D’Orleans-Juste
    • 1
  • S. Dion
    • 1
  • N. E. Rhaleb
    • 1
  • D. Regoli
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pharmacology, Medical SchoolUniversity of SherbrookeSherbrookeCanada

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