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Chronic Neuroleptic Administration Reduces Striatal Substance P mRNA and the Localization of Substance P mRNA in Rat Brain by In Situ Hybridization

  • J. A. Angulo
  • L. G. Davis
  • B. A. Burkhart
  • G. R. Christoph
Conference paper

Abstract

Chronic treatment of rats with the neuroleptic drug haloperidol, a dopamine receptor antagonist, decreases the concentration of substance P (SP) in the substantia nigra (SN). This drug-induced reduction in peptide concentration was found to be concomitant with the reduction of the mRNA in the striatum which encodes SP. The mRNA encoding substance K (SK), a related tachykinin peptide, was similarly reduced by haloperidol, whereas striatal enkephalin-mRNA was elevated. The results demonstrate that pharmacological blockade of dopamine receptors can differentially affect neuropeptide gene expression.

SP-mRNA was localized by in situ hybridization. Brain structures that gave positive hybridization signals were caudate, premammillary area and arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus, central nucleus of the amygdala, nucleus accumbens, and medial habenula.

Keywords

Substantia Nigra Central Nucleus Arcuate Nucleus Dopamine Receptor Antagonist Positive Hybridization Signal 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. A. Angulo
    • 1
  • L. G. Davis
    • 1
  • B. A. Burkhart
    • 1
  • G. R. Christoph
    • 1
  1. 1.Neurobiology GroupE.I. du Pont de Nemours and CompanyWilmingtonUSA

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