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Abstract

Every human being of adult years and sound mind has a right to determine what shall be done with his own body and a surgeon who performs an operation without his patient’s consent commits an assault for which he is liable in damages.1

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References

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© 1989 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

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Sprung, C.L., Winick, B.J. (1989). Informed Consent. In: Vevaina, J.R., Bone, R.C., Kassoff, E. (eds) Legal Aspects of Medicine. Springer, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4612-4534-6_10

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4612-4534-6_10

  • Publisher Name: Springer, New York, NY

  • Print ISBN: 978-1-4612-8867-1

  • Online ISBN: 978-1-4612-4534-6

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