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Common Peroneal Nerve Entrapment

Entrapment at the Fibular Head
  • Oscar A. Turner
  • Norman Taslitz
  • Steven Ward

Abstract

Because of its course at the head of the fibula, the peroneal nerve and its branches are subject to various forms of entrapment, each having relatively specific symptomatology. Because of the superficial position of the nerve resting on the underlying bone, the common peroneal nerve is vulnerable to entrapment with numerous etiologic factors (Fig. 23). Peroneal nerve entrapment may involve either the superficial peroneal nerve, the deep division, or the common trunk, each of which will be dealt with separately.

Keywords

Peroneal Nerve Ankle Sprain Common Peroneal Nerve Nerve Entrapment Fibular Head 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References and Further Reading

  1. Haymaker, W. and Woodhall, B. (1945) Peripheral Nerve Injuries: Principals of Diagnosis (W. B. Saunders Co., Philadelphia, Pa.), pg. 200.Google Scholar
  2. Kashuk, K. (1977) Proximal peripheral nerve entrapment syndromes in the lower extremity, J. Am. Pod. Assoc., 67, 529–544.Google Scholar
  3. Meals, R. A. (1977) Peroneal nerve palsy complicating ankle sprain: report of two cases and review of the literature. J. Bone and Joint Surg., 59A, No. 7, 966–968.Google Scholar
  4. Seletz, E. (1951) Surgery of Peripheral Nerves (Charles C. Thomas, Springfield, Ill.), pg. 145.Google Scholar
  5. Takabe, K. and Hirahata, K. (1981) Peroneal nerve palsy due to fabella, Arch. Orthop. Traumat. Surg. 99, 91–95.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© The Humana Press Inc. 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Oscar A. Turner
    • 1
  • Norman Taslitz
    • 1
  • Steven Ward
    • 1
  1. 1.College of MedicineNortheastern Ohio UniversitiesRootstownUSA

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