Cubital Tunnel Syndrome

Ulnar Nerve
  • Oscar A. Turner
  • Norman Taslitz
  • Steven Ward

Abstract

Entrapment of the ulnar nerve is most frequently observed in the cubital tunnel, and is observed more frequently in males and most often on the right side. It may occur bilaterally, at times associated with diabetes or alcoholism, and in some instances may occur years after any precipitating trauma. This has been referred to as a “tardy ulnar paralysis.” Whereas direct trauma to the nerve will result in the neuropathy, stretching and compression with subsequent changes in the nerve will result in dysfunction.

Keywords

Burning Neuropathy Neurol Leprosy Eisen 

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References and Further Reading

  1. Copell, H. P. and Thompson, W. A. L. (1976) Peripheral Entrapment Neuropathies, Robert E. Krieger, Huntington, NY., pp. 127–134.Google Scholar
  2. Craven, P. R., Green, D. P. (1980) Cubital tunnel syndrome, J. Bone & Joint Surg. 62-A, No. 6, 986–989.Google Scholar
  3. Eisen, A. and Danon, J. (1974) The mild cubital tunnel syndrome, J. Neur. 24, 608–613.Google Scholar
  4. Foster, R. J. and Edshage, S. (1981) Factors related to the outcome of surgically managed compressive ulnar neuropathy at the elbow level, J. Hand Surg. 6, 181–192.Google Scholar
  5. Laha, R. K. and Panchal, P. D. (1979) Surgical treatment of ulnar neuropathy, Surg. Neurol. 11, 393–398.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. Miller, R. G. and Hummell, E. E. (1980) The cubital tunnel syndrome; treatment with simple decompression, Ann. Neurol. 6, 567–569.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Neblett, C. and Ehni, G. (1970) Medial epicondylectomy for ulnar palsy, J. Neurosurg. 32, 55–62.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© The Humana Press Inc. 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Oscar A. Turner
    • 1
  • Norman Taslitz
    • 1
  • Steven Ward
    • 1
  1. 1.College of MedicineNortheastern Ohio UniversitiesRootstownUSA

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