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Microbiology and Drinking Water Filtration

  • Gary S. Logsdon
Part of the Brock/Springer Series in Contemporary Bioscience book series (BROCK/SPRINGER)

Abstract

Water filtration research has been undertaken for a variety of reasons. Studies have been performed to develop information for filtration theories and for design of filtration plants to remove suspended matter such as clays, algae, suspended matter in general, and asbestos fibers from water. Filtration studies related to removal of microorganisms have generally been motivated by the need to learn about the removal of pathogens or indicator organisms, or both. Reducing the risk of waterborne disease has been a goal of microbiologically related filtration research for nearly 100 years. This chapter briefly reviews that research and then discusses the results of recent investigations.

Keywords

Total Coliform Nephelometric Turbidity Unit Turbidity Removal American Water Work Association Giardia Cyst 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gary S. Logsdon
    • 1
  1. 1.Environmental Protection Agency CincinnatiUSA

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