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Legionella in Drinking Water

  • Stanley J. States
  • Robert M. Wadowsky
  • John M. Kuchta
  • Randy S. Wolford
  • Louis F. Conley
  • Robert B. Yee
Part of the Brock/Springer Series in Contemporary Bioscience book series (BROCK/SPRINGER)

Abstract

In July 1976, an outbreak of acute respiratory illness occurred during an American Legion convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Of 4,400 attendees, and some other individuals not directly associated with the convention, 221 became ill and 34 of these cases died (Fraser et al., 1977). The cause of the epidemic was unknown until later that year, when investigators at the Centers for Disease Control isolated the responsible bacterium, subsequently termed Legionella pneumophila (lung-loving) (McDade et al., 1977).

Keywords

Environmental Microbiology Cooling Tower Free Chlorine Plumbing System Chlorine Dioxide 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stanley J. States
    • 1
  • Robert M. Wadowsky
    • 2
  • John M. Kuchta
    • 1
  • Randy S. Wolford
    • 1
  • Louis F. Conley
    • 1
  • Robert B. Yee
    • 3
  1. 1.City of Pittsburgh Water DepartmentUniversity of PittsburghUSA
  2. 2.School of MedicineUniversity of PittsburghUSA
  3. 3.Graduate School of Public HealthUniversity of PittsburghPittsburghUSA

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