Effect of Bed Shear Stresses on the Deposition and Strength of Deposited Cohesive Muds

  • Emmanuel Partheniades
Part of the Frontiers in Sedimentary Geology book series (SEDIMENTARY)

Abstract

Fine-grain marine sediments consist predominantly of silt and clay of various mineralogical compositions. In almost all natural water environments these sediments flocculate as a result of their net surface physicochemical forces. In a flow field the basic settling and eroding unit is the floe rather than the individual particle. Floes constitute the primary or first-order agglomeration of fine particles formed by random collision and attachment. The same process may generate second- and third-order agglomerations, or floe aggregates, ultimately forming a continuous aggregate network (Krone, 1963; Partheniades, 1965, 1986a, b, c).

Keywords

Clay Torque Sedimentation Stratification Silt 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Emmanuel Partheniades

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