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Family Adjustment to Minor Traumatic Brain Injury

  • Paul R. Sachs

Abstract

Families are recognized as an important part of the rehabilitation process for the survivor of severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). With this importance in mind, rehabilitation professionals have developed specific treatment approaches for families of these survivors (1–4).

Keywords

Traumatic Brain Injury Severe Traumatic Brain Injury Adjustment Problem Emotional Change Cognitive Remediation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul R. Sachs

There are no affiliations available

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