Validity and Reliability of the Alzheimer’s Disease Cooperative Study-Clinical Global Impression of Change (ADCS-CGIC)

  • Lon S. Schneider
  • Jason T. Olin
  • Rachelle S. Doody
  • Christopher M. Clark
  • John C. Morris
  • Barry Reisberg
  • Steven H. Ferris
  • Frederick A. Schmitt
  • Michael Grundman
  • Ronald G. Thomas
Part of the Advances in Alzheimer Disease Therapy book series (AADT)

Abstract

Clinical global impressions of change (CGICs) are important measures of efficacy in clinical trials. CGIC scales have been used extensively as primary outcome criteria in psychopharmacological trials and in early clinical trials for antidementia drugs (e.g., Schneider and Olin, 1994). CGICs have been reported to be the most sensitive index of change in 14 of 17 dementia trials, when compared to other measures (Lehmann, 1984).

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Copyright information

© Birkhäuser Boston 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lon S. Schneider
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jason T. Olin
    • 1
  • Rachelle S. Doody
    • 3
  • Christopher M. Clark
    • 4
  • John C. Morris
    • 5
  • Barry Reisberg
    • 6
  • Steven H. Ferris
    • 6
  • Frederick A. Schmitt
    • 7
  • Michael Grundman
    • 8
  • Ronald G. Thomas
    • 8
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry, School of GeronotologyUniversity of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  2. 2.Department of Neurology, School of GeronotologyUniversity of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  3. 3.Department of NeurologyBaylor College of MedicineWacoUSA
  4. 4.Department of NeurologyUniversity of Pennsylvania School of MedicinePhiladelphiaUSA
  5. 5.Department of NeurologyWashington University School of MedicineSt. LouisUSA
  6. 6.Department of PsychiatryNew York University Medical CenterNYUSA
  7. 7.Department of NeurologyUniversity of KentuckyLexingtonUSA
  8. 8.University of CaliforniaSan DiegoUSA

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