Logging Effects on the Aquatic Ecosystem: A Case Study in the Carnation Creek Experimental Watershed on Canada’s West Coast

  • Eugene D. Hetherington
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 116)

Abstract

The Carnation Creek Experimental Watershed Project was initiated in 1970 to investigate the impacts of forest harvesting on vegetation, soil, water, and fish in a typical coastal rainforest salmonid stream ecosystem. A major emphasis was placed on the stream system and the production of salmon. Monitoring of hydrometeorological parameters, vegetation changes, and forestry activities provided necessary information for interpretation of fisheries and stream-related data. The project was originally scheduled for completion in 1986, but was continued because of recognition that important changes in the stream channel and in fish populations are still occurring. In the context of climate change and the extremely limited amount of information on streamflow, precipitation, and fish life cycles in mountainous coastal watersheds, the relatively long length of the Carnation Creek data record is becoming increasingly valuable.

Keywords

Burning Phosphorus Steam Sedimentation Gravel 

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© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1996

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  • Eugene D. Hetherington

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