The Effects of Compliant Walls on Transition and Turbulence

  • Earl H. Dowell
  • Marat Ilgamov

Summary

Normally aeroelastic phenomena are considered deleterious or even destructive. However Ashley (Chapter 0, Ref. 7) has emphasized the possible beneficial effects of aeroelasticity. Perhaps the most exciting possibility for a favorable effect of aero-elasticity is that of reduction of drag on a body through the aeroelastic (or hydroelastic) interaction of a compliant wall and the surrounding fluid stream. Not surprisingly, perhaps, since the full understanding of such a possible effect requires nothing less than an understanding of fluid turbulence and its interaction with a compliant wall, progress has occurred in fits and starts and the subject is far from completely understood. In this chapter our present knowledge of this fascinating topic is considered.

A review is undertaken to identify the major findings of the research community and to suggest future directions. An annotated, selective bibliography is also included. A fundamental theoretical approach to the problem is proposed. Two possible thrusts are identified. One is the study of the limit cycle oscillations of the Navier-Stokes equations for a boundary layer flow over a compliant wall or Poiseuille flow in a channel with compliant walls. The other is a complementary study of a simpler, sequential theoretical model which partially decouples the fluid and wall motions. The first study is more rigorously based but will be initially limited to Reynolds numbers in the transition region. The second, more approximate approach will allow consideration of fully developed turbulent flow. It is a principal premise of this chapter that our understanding of turbulence transition and structure will be substantially advanced when a soundly based theoretical model is available to guide, interpret, and suggest experiments. These experiments should, in turn, validate or lead to improvements in the theoretical models.

Keywords

Foam Lution Kato Weinstein 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Earl H. Dowell
    • 1
  • Marat Ilgamov
    • 2
  1. 1.School of EngineeringDuke UniversityDurhamUSA
  2. 2.Kazan Branch of the USSRAcademy of SciencesKazanUSSR

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