Advertisement

Behavior Management and Intervention

  • James K. Luiselli

Abstract

Behavioral psychology has made numerous contributions to education, mental health, and related disciplines.1 For example, behavior therapy and behavioral intervention techniques have been applied with considerable success in such areas as mental retardation (Wetherby & Baumeister, 1981), psychiatry (Hersen & Bellack, 1978), and rehabilitation (Lutzker, Martin, & Rice, 1981). A more recent development related to the area of behavior therapy is the field of behavioral medicine in which learning-based interventions are used for the treatment and management of somatic disorders (Luiselli, 1987; Varni, 1983).

Keywords

Behavior Therapy Obese Child Behavioral Medicine Behavior Analysis Behavior Management 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Allen, L. D., & Iwata, B. A. (1980). Reinforcing exercise maintenance using high-rate activities. Behavior Modification, 4, 337–354.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Allison, M. G., & Ayllon, T. (1980). Behavioral coaching in the development of skills in football, gymnastics, and tennis. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 13, 297–314.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Altman, K., Bondy, A., & Hirsch, G. (1978). Behavioral treatment of obesity in patients with Prader-Willi syndrome. Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 1, 403–412.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Azrin, N. H., & Wesolowski, M. D. (1974). Theft reversal: An overcorrection procedure for eliminating stealing by retarded persons. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 7, 577–581.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Bornstein, M., Bellack, A. S., & Hersen, M. (1980). Social skills training for highly aggressive children: Treatment in an inpatient psychiatric setting. Behavior Modification, 4, 173–186.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Bornstein, P. H., Hamilton, S. B., & McFall, M. E. (1981). Modification of adult aggression: A critical review of theory, research, and practice. In M. Hersen, R. M. Eisler & P. M. Miller (Eds.), Progress in behavior modification, volume 12 (pp. 299–350). New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  7. Bornstein, P. H., & Rychtarik, R. G. (1983). Consumer satisfaction in adult behavior therapy: Procedures, problems, and future perspectives. Behavior Therapy, 14, 191–208.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Brownell, K. D. (1982). Obesity: Understanding and treating a seroius, prevalent, and refractory disorder. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 50, 820–840.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Bucher, B. B., Reykdal, B., & Albin, J. (1976). Brief restraint to control pica in retarded children. Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, 7, 137–140.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Carr, E. G., Newsom, C. D., & Binkoff, J. A. (1980). Escape as a factor in the aggressive behavior of two retarded children. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 13, 101–117.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Coplin, S. S., Hine, J., & Gormican, A. (1976). Out-patient dietary management in the Prader-Willi syndrome. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 68, 330–334.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  12. Coates, T. J., & Thoresen, C. E. (1981). Behavior and weight changes in three obese adolescents. Behavior Therapy, 12, 383–399.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Drabman, R. S., Cordua, G. D., Hammer, D., Jarvie, G. J., & Horton, W. (1979). Developmental trends in eating rates of normal and overwieght preschool children. Child Development, 50, 211–216.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Drabman, R. S., Hammer, D., & Jarvie, G. J. (1977). Eating styles of obese and non-obese black and white children in a naturalistic setting. Addictive Behaviors, 2, 83–86.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Drabman, R. S., & Spitalnik, R. (1973). Social isolation as a punishment procedure: A controlled study. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 16, 236–249.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Epstein, L. H., Masek, B. J., & Marshall, W. R. (1978). A nutritionally-based school programs for control of eating in obese children. Behavior Therapy, 9, 766–778.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Epstein, L. H., Parker, L., McCoy, J. F., & McGee, G. (1976). Descriptive analysis of eating regulations in obese and nonobese children. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 7, 402–416.Google Scholar
  18. Epstein, L. H., & Wing, R. R. (1980). Behavioral approaches to exercise habits and athletic performance. In J. Ferguson & C. B. Taylor (Eds.), Advances in behavioral medicine, 1, Holliswood, NY: Spectrum.Google Scholar
  19. Epstein, L. H., Wing, R. R., Koeske, R., Ossip, D. J, & Beck, S. (1982). A comparison of life-style change and programmed aerobic exercise on weight and fitness changes in obese children. Behavior Therapy, 13, 651–665.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Epstein, L. H., Wing, R. R, Thompson, J. K., & Griffin, W. (1980). Attendance and fitness in aerobics exercise. Behavior Modification, 4, 465–479.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Epstein, L. H., Woodall, K., Goreczny, A. J., Wing, R. R., & Robertson, R. J. (1984). The modification of activity patterns and energy expenditure in obese young girls. Behavior Therapy, 15, 101–108.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Finney, J. W., Russo, D. C., & Cataldo, M. F. (1982). Reduction of pica in young children with lead poisoning. Journal of Pediatric Psychology, 7, 197–207.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Foxx, R., Switsky, H., Rotatori, A., & Vitkus, P. (1982). Successful weight loss techniques with mentally retarded children and youth. Exceptional Children, 49, 238–244.Google Scholar
  24. Foxx, R. M., & Martin, E. D. (1975). Treatment of scavenging behavior (copraphagy and pica) by overcorrection. Behavior Research and Therapy, 13, 153–162.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Foxx, R. M., & Shapiro, S. T. (1978). The time-out ribbon: A nonexclusionary timeout procedure. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 11, 125–136.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Frederiksen, L. W., Jenkins, J. O., Foy, D. W., & Eisler, R. M. (1976). Social skills training in the modification of abusive verbal outbursts in adults. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 9, 117–125.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Graziano, A. M., & Katz, J. N. (1982). Training paraprofessionals. In A. A Bellack, M. Hersen, & A. E. Kazdin (Eds.), International handbook of behavior modification and therapy (pp. 207–229). New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  28. Henderson, J. Q. (1981). A behavioral approach to stealing: A proposal for treatment based on ten cases. Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, 12, 231–236.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Hersen, M., & Barlow, D. H. (1984). Single case experimental designs: Strategies for studying behavior change. New York: Pergamon Press.Google Scholar
  30. Hersen, M., & Bellack, A. S. (Eds.). (1978). Behavior therapy in the psychiatric setting. Baltimore, MD: Williams and Wilkins.Google Scholar
  31. Hersen, M., & Bellack, A. S. (1981). Behavioral assessment. New York: Pergamon Press.Google Scholar
  32. Kanner, L. (1957). Child psychiatry. Springfield, IL: Charles C. Thomas.Google Scholar
  33. Kazdin, A. E. (1982a). History of behavior modification. In A. A. Beilack, M. Hersen, & A. E. Kazdin (Eds.), International handbook of behavior modification and therapy, (pp. 3–32). New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  34. Kazdin, A. E. (1982b). Single case research designs: Methods for clinical and applied settings. New York: Oxford.Google Scholar
  35. Keane, T. M., Geller, S. E., & Scheirer, C. J. (1981). A parametric investigation of eating styles in obese and nonobese children. Behavior Therapy, 12, 280–286.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Luiselli, J. D. (1987). Behavioral medicine research and treatment in developmental disabilities. In R. Barrett & J. L. Matson (Eds.), Advances in developmental disorders. (pp. 1–39). Greenwich, CT: JAI Press.Google Scholar
  37. Luiselli, J. K. (1987). Behavior management in a deaf-blind youth using response interruption and protective environment time-out. Manuscript submitted for publication.Google Scholar
  38. Luiselli, J. K., & Brown, C. A. (1987). Combining reinforcement and nonexclusionary time-out procedures in a residential treatment program for aggressive, mentally retarded adults. Manuscript submitted for publication.Google Scholar
  39. Luiselli, J. K., Myles, E., & Littman-Quinn, J. (1983). Analysis of a reinforcement/ time-out treatment package to control severe aggressive and destructive behaviors in a multihandicapped, rubella child. Applied Research in Mental Retardation 4, 65–78.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. Luiselli, J. K., & Reisman, J. (1980). Some variations in the use of differential reinforcement procedures with mentally retarded children in specialized treatment settings. Applied Research in Mental Retardation, 1, 277–288.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. Luiselli, J. K., & Slocumb, P. R. (1983). Management of multiple aggressive behaviors by differential reinforcement. Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, 14, 343–347.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. Lutzker, J. R., Martin, J. A, & Rice, J. M. (1981). Behavior therapy in rehabilitation. In M. Hersen, R.M. Eisler, & P.M. Miller (Eds.), Progress in behavior modification. (Vol. 12, pp. 171–226). New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  43. Madden, N. A., Russo, D. C, & Cataldo, M. F. (1980). Behavioral treatment of pica in children with lead poisoning. Child Behavior Therapy, 2, 67–81.Google Scholar
  44. Mahoney, M. J. (1974). Cognition and behavior modification. Cambridge, MA: Ballinger.Google Scholar
  45. Marholin II, D., Siegel, L. J., & Phillips, D. (1976). Treatment and transfer: A search for empirical procedures. In M. Hersen, R. M. Eisler, & P. M. Miller (Eds.), Progress in behavioral modification. (Vol. 3, pp. 293–342). New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  46. Marshall, B. D., Wallace, C. J., Elder, J., Burke, K., Oliver, T., & Blackmon, R. (1981). A behavioral approach to treatment of Prader-Willi syndrome. In W. A. Holm, S. J. Sulzbacher, & P. L. Pipes (Eds.), Prader-Willi syndrome. Baltimore, MD: University Park Press.Google Scholar
  47. Martin, J. E. (1981). Exercise management: Shaping and maintaining physical fitness. Behavioral Medicine Advances, 4, 3–5.Google Scholar
  48. Martin, J. E., & Dubbert, P. M. (1982). Exercise applications and promotion in behavioral medicine: Current status and future directions. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 50, 1004–1017.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  49. Masek, B. J., Epstein, L. H., & Russo, D. C. (1981). Behavioral perspectives in preventive medicine. In S. M. Turner, K. S. Calhoun, & H. E. Adams (Eds.), Handbook of clinical behavior therapy, (pp. 475–499). New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
  50. McMahon, R. J., & Forehand, R. L. (1983). Consumer satisfaction in behavioral treatment in children: Types, issues, and recommendations. Behavior Therapy, 14, 209–225.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  51. Morris, R. J., & Brown, K. (1983). Legal issues in behavior modification with the mentally retarded. In J. L. Matson & F. Andrasik (Eds.), Treatment issues and innovations in mental retardation. (pp. 61–96). New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  52. Mulick, J. A., Barbour, R., Schroeder, S. R., & Rojahn, J. (1980). Overcorrection of pica in two profoundly retarded adults: Analysis of setting events, stimulus, and response generalization. Applied Research in Mental Retardation, 1, 241–252.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  53. Mulick, J. A., & Schroeder, S. R. (1980). Research relating to management of antisocial behavior in mentally retarded persons. The Psychological Record, 30, 397–417.Google Scholar
  54. Page, T. J., Finney, J. W., Parrish, J. M., & Iwata, B. A. (1983). Assessment and reduction of food stealing in Prader-Willi children. Applied Research in Mental Retardation, 4, 219–228.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  55. Page, T. J., Stanley, A. E., Richman, G. S., Deal, R. M., & Iwata, B. A. (1983). Reduction of food theft and long-term maintenance of weight loss in a Prader-Willi adult. Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, 14, 261–268.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  56. Porterfield, J. K., Herbert-Jackson, E., & Risley, T. R. (1976). Contingent observation: An effective and acceptable procedure for reducing disruptive behavior of young children in a group setting. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 9, 55–64.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  57. Russo, D. C, Cataldo, M. F., & Cushing, P. J. (1981). Compliance training and behavioral covariation in the treatment of multiple behavior problems. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 14, 209–222.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  58. Singh, N. N., & Winton, A. S. W. (1984). Effects of a screening procedure on pica and collateral behaviors. Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, 15, 59–65.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  59. Skinner, B. F. (1953). Science and human behavior. New York: MacMillan.Google Scholar
  60. Stokes, T. F., & Baer, D. M. (1977). An implicit technology of generalization. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 10, 349–367.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  61. Stunkard, A. J. (1982). Obesity. In A. S. Bellack, M. Hersen, & A. E. Kazdin (Eds.), International handbook of behavior modification and therapy. (pp. 535–573). New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  62. Thompson, T., Kodluboy, S., & Heston, L. (1980). Behavioral treatment of obesity in Prader-Willi syndrome. Behavior Therapy, 11, 588–593.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  63. Varni, J. W. (1983). Clinical behavioral pediatrics. New York: Pergamon Press.Google Scholar
  64. Winton, A. S. W., & Singh, N. N. (1983). Suppression of pica using brief-duration physical restraint. Journal of Mental Deficiency Research, 27, 93–103.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  65. Wetherby, B., & Baumeister, A. A (1981). Mental retardation. In S. M. Turner, C. S. Calhoun, & H. E. Adams (Eds.), Handbook of clinical behavior therapy. (pp. 635–664). New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
  66. Wolf, M. M. (1979). Social validity: The case for subjective measurement of how applied behavior analysis is finding its heart. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 11, 203–214.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  67. Wysocki, T., Hall, G., Iwata, B. A., & Riordan, M. (1979). Behavioral management of exercise: Contracting for aerobics points. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 12, 55–64.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • James K. Luiselli

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations