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On the Evolution of Self-Knowledge and Self-Deception

  • Dennis Krebs
  • Kathy Denton
  • Nancy C. Higgins

Abstract

“Know yourself” is one of the most ancient of all injunctions. Although some primates possess the ability to recognize their own faces, and therefore must possess a rudimentary sense of self (Gallup, 1977), humans appear to be unique among animals in their ability to know themselves. What is the nature of this ability? How did it evolve, and why? How effective are the processes through which people acquire self-knowledge, and how valid are the story by telling its end, we will conclude that it often is maladaptive to perceive oneself accurately, that people are at least as adept at self-serving way, and that people are at least as adept at self-deception as they are at self-perception.

Keywords

Left Hemisphere Moral Reasoning Inclusive Fitness Experimental Social Psychology Voice Recognition 
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© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dennis Krebs
  • Kathy Denton
  • Nancy C. Higgins

There are no affiliations available

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