Socialization in the Context of the Family: A Sociobiological Perspective

  • Kevin B. MacDonald

Abstract

Because of its status as the primeval form of human social organization, the human family must play a central role in evolutionary theorizing about development. The purpose of this chapter is to provide a sociobiological framework within which substantial areas of the literature on the family deriving from developmental psychology can be integrated.

Keywords

Sugar Europe Schizophrenia Assure Social Stratification 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kevin B. MacDonald

There are no affiliations available

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