Demographic Framework for Analysis of Insect Life Histories

  • James R. Carey
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Statistics book series (LNS, volume 55)

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to generalize both cohort and population phenomena. All cohort properties are viewed as ‘events’ and divided into two types: i) non-renewable—events that cannot be repeated (eg. death); and ii) renewable-events that can be repeated (eg. reproduction). A framework for examining averages and heterogeneity of each type is presented. The foundation for examining population properties is the stable population model. An organizational framework for the conventional population parameters is presented as well as two example extensions: i) a two-sex model; and ii) harvesting models. A brief discussion at the end emphasizes the importance of understanding the more generic properties of insect life histories.

Keywords

Entropy Melon Metaphor Carol 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • James R. Carey
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of EntomologyUniversity of CaliforniaDavisUSA

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