An Integrated Nursing Information System—A Planning Model

  • Karen A. Rieder
  • Dena A. Norton
Part of the Computers and Medicine book series (C+M)

Abstract

The benefits of computer technology to nursing are predicated on the profession’s ability to define its requirements in the areas of practice, education, and research. Often the information to be accepted, processed, and printed by a computer for a nursing work center has been identified and determined by technical rather than by functional experts. Since nurse users have been reluctant to commit the time and energy necessary to define their automation demands, they have been forced to fit their needs to already established systems. This has resulted in a mismatch between computer technology and nursing requirements.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Karen A. Rieder
  • Dena A. Norton

There are no affiliations available

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