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Delegitimization: The Extreme Case of Stereotyping and Prejudice

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Part of the Springer Series in Social Psychology book series (SSSOC)

Abstract

Social psychology has devoted much effort to the exploration of various social representations in the form of beliefs and attitudes, which serve to characterize social categories of individuals within the context of intergroup relations (Hamilton, 1981; Stephan, 1985). One outcome of this effort has been extensive study of two social representations — stereotypes and prejudice. Stereotypes are beliefs about another group in such terms as personality traits, attributions, or behavioral descriptions (Brewer & Kramer, 1985; Hamilton, 1981). Prejudice refers to negative attitudes toward another group that express negative affective or emotional reactions (Allport, 1954; Jones, 1972; Pettigrew, 1971; Stephan, 1985). Both categories, being loosely defined, are highly general concepts that lack explicit specifications regarding their outcomes in terms of the nature of intergroup relations. Thus, the contents of stereotypes are of a wide scope, ranging from descriptions with negative to positive connotations (e.g., lazy, superstitious, industrious, shrewd — see Katz & Braly, 1933). Likewise, although the conception of prejudice implies negative affective reaction, it does not specify the intensity of such reactions, and, therefore, may range from mildly to extremely negative. In addition, the two concepts focus mainly on cognitive and affective components of intergroup relations, and do not necessarily specify their role in guiding actual behavior towards the other group.

Keywords

  • Experimental Social Psychology
  • Intergroup Relation
  • Group Uniformity
  • Nazi Regime
  • Behavioral Implication

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Bar-Tal, D. (1989). Delegitimization: The Extreme Case of Stereotyping and Prejudice. In: Bar-Tal, D., Graumann, C.F., Kruglanski, A.W., Stroebe, W. (eds) Stereotyping and Prejudice. Springer Series in Social Psychology. Springer, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4612-3582-8_8

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4612-3582-8_8

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