Changing Stereotypes with Disconfirming Information

  • Miles Hewstone
Part of the Springer Series in Social Psychology book series (SSSOC)

Abstract

Some of the most powerful bases of intergroup stereotyping are rooted in the social and economic structure of society itself. Whether we are talking about blacks and whites in the U.K. or the U.S., Germans and Turks in the Federal Republic of Germany, or Catholics and Protestants in Northern Ireland, it should be acknowledged at the outset that such groups are often characterized by different living conditions, different occupational positions, and so on (see Hewstone & Brown, 1986a). These structural factors notwithstanding, social psychologists can arguably best analyze stereotypes in terms of their psychological bases and consequences. This chapter deals with how stereotypes can be changed by providing information that disconfirms existing, predominantly negative images of the outgroup.

Keywords

Assimilation Sonal Cantril 

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  • Miles Hewstone

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