Cognitive and Social Factors as Predictors of Normal and Atypical Language Development

  • Janice A. Miller
  • Linda S. Siegel
Part of the Springer Series in Cognitive Development book series (SSCOG)

Abstract

The ability to use language is one of the most important means with which children interact with their environment. With language, they learn about and categorize the events and objects in their world, make their needs known, and engage in social interaction. The language they hear in the environment may help them to classify and modify their own behavior (e.g., Luria, 1982). When a language delay is present, it obstructs the ability to express ideas and to understand the significance of daily events. Identification of a language difficulty at an early age, therefore, has potential importance for the development of the child.

Keywords

Posit Hunt Dyslexia 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Janice A. Miller
  • Linda S. Siegel

There are no affiliations available

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