Neurotransmitters and Neurotransmitter Receptors in Depressed Suicide Victims

  • S. C. Cheetham
  • J. A. Cross
  • M. R. Crompton
  • C. Z. Czudek
  • C. L. E. Katona
  • S. J. Parker
  • G. P. Reynolds
  • R. W. Horton
Chapter

Abstract

Repeated antidepressant drug and electroshock administration to animals alters several classes of cortical neurotransmitter receptors.1 The role of these adaptive receptor changes in the therapeutic action of antidepressants and the possibility that altered receptors underlie the biological basis of depressive illness can be studied meaningfully only in depressed subjects.

Keywords

HPLC Depression Dopamine Schizophrenia Carbon Monoxide 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. C. Cheetham
  • J. A. Cross
  • M. R. Crompton
  • C. Z. Czudek
  • C. L. E. Katona
  • S. J. Parker
  • G. P. Reynolds
  • R. W. Horton

There are no affiliations available

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