One Form of Bipolar Affective Disorder is Mapped to Chromosome 11

  • Kenneth K. Kidd
  • Janice A. Egeland
  • Daniela S. Gerhard
  • David L. Pauls
  • James N. Sussex
  • Cleona R. Allen
  • Abram M. Hostetter
  • Judith R. Kidd
  • Andrew J. Pakstis
  • David E. Housman
Chapter

Abstract

Geneticists have long recognized the power of genetic linkage as a tool in understanding complex traits, but lack of adequate numbers of genetic markers in humans has been a barrier to the use of genetic linkage to understand complex human disorders. The discovery of large numbers of genetic markers identifiable directly in the DNA—the restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs)—and the rapidly developing international effort to map the human genome have removed that barrier. Genetic linkage can now be used routinely to identify major loci responsible for complex human disorders as the first step toward understanding the etiology and pathogenesis of a disorder. Here we briefly review the evidence for a major locus causing bipolar affective disorder and discuss some of the implications of the finding.

Keywords

Depression Tyrosine Catecholamine 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kenneth K. Kidd
  • Janice A. Egeland
  • Daniela S. Gerhard
  • David L. Pauls
  • James N. Sussex
  • Cleona R. Allen
  • Abram M. Hostetter
  • Judith R. Kidd
  • Andrew J. Pakstis
  • David E. Housman

There are no affiliations available

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