The Rationale Behind Problem-based Learning

  • Henk G. Schmidt
Part of the Frontiers of Primary Care book series (PRIMARY)

Abstract

The goal of this chapter is to describe the process of problem-based learning in the light of current theories of human information processing. First, three principles of learning are discussed. Second, a detailed account is given of how students transform a problem into a series of learning activities using a systematic working procedure. Finally, the extent to which these activities, undertaken within the problem-based format, fit the principles of learning will be assessed.

Keywords

Influenza Tuberculosis Explosive Bacillus Smoke 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1989

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  • Henk G. Schmidt

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