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Introduction

  • Jeffrey D. Fisher
  • Roxane Cohen Silver
  • Jack M. Chinsky
  • Barry Goff
  • Yechiel Klar
Part of the Recent Research in Psychology book series (PSYCHOLOGY)

Abstract

Groups associated with the human potential movement have been a controversial feature of American life during the last three decades. In the 1950’s and 1960’s, the movement was dominated by various types of small groups (SGs), which included sensitivity training groups, encounter groups, as well as several others (see Lieberman, Yalom, & Miles, 1973). Some people viewed SGs as an effective means for attaining personal and organizational growth, and Carl Rogers, one of the founders of this movement, labeled small groups as “the most rapidly spreading social invention of the century, and probably the most potent” (Rogers, 1970). In contrast, others attacked SGs as “the most extreme exhibition thus far of man’s talent for reducing, distorting, evading, and vulgarizing his own reality” (Koch, 1973, p. 639). Nevertheless, SGs generally became an accepted tool for personal development and were incorporated into university curricula and managerial training programs.

Keywords

Random Assignment Wait List Control Group Placebo Control Group Wait List Group Adequate Control Group 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© J.D. Fisher, R.C. Silver, J.M. Chinsky, B. Goff, and Y. Klar 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jeffrey D. Fisher
    • 1
  • Roxane Cohen Silver
    • 2
  • Jack M. Chinsky
    • 1
  • Barry Goff
    • 1
  • Yechiel Klar
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of ConnecticutStorrsUSA
  2. 2.Program in Social EcologyUniversity of California, IrvineIrvineUSA

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