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Opioids

  • H. Thomas MilhornJr.

Abstract

The term opioid is used to designate a group of drugs that are, to varying degrees, morphine-like in their properties. Opioids include naturally occurring, semisynthetic, synthetic, agonist-antagonist, and pure antagonist drugs. The term opiate is often used to refer only to the naturally occurring opioids and their semisynthetic derivatives. Because of the ability of opioid analgesics to produce somnolence, they are often referred to as narcotics, a word that comes from narcosis—meaning “sleep.” 7,10

Keywords

Opioid Analgesic Opioid Drug Opioid Abuse Abstinence Syndrome Codeine Phosphate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Verlag New York Inc. 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Thomas MilhornJr.
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Family MedicineUniversity of Mississippi Medical CenterMississippiUSA

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