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Strategy Instruction Is Often Insufficient: Addressing the Interdependency of Executive and Attributional Processes

  • Andrea K. Groteluschen
  • John G. Borkowski
  • Catherine Hale
Chapter

Abstract

For several decades, research on the amelioration of learning disabilities (LD) has focused on the training of learning and memory strategies (Ceci, 1987). The intent was to reduce or eliminate performance deficits in LD children by developing learning skills that, for many reasons, had failed to emerge as normal development would predict. Alhough this research focus met with some success (Borkowski, Johnston, & Reid, 1987), problems of strategy maintenance and generalization have remained an obstacle for in-laboratory research and its classroom applications: Learning disabled children who have acquired study strategies generally do not deploy these strategies without prompting on new tasks or with materials different from those used during training (Borkowski et al., 1987).

Keywords

Educational Psychology Learn Disability Learn Disability Strategy Training Strategy Maintenance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrea K. Groteluschen
  • John G. Borkowski
  • Catherine Hale

There are no affiliations available

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