Application of Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) Spectroscopy in Soil Chemistry

  • N. Senesi
Part of the Advances in Soil Science book series (SOIL, volume 14)

Abstract

Organic free radicals and most transition metal ions are characterized by the presence in their structure of one or more unpaired electron(s), that is, they are paramagnetic, and may produce electron spin resonance (ESR) signals in both the free state and any organic and inorganic association in which they maintain unpaired electron(s), in either solid or solution state.

Keywords

Humic Substance Humic Acid Fulvic Acid Electron Spin Resonance Signal Spin Probe 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1990

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  • N. Senesi

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