Disorders of Growth and Short Stature: Medical Overview

  • Patricia A. Rieser
  • Louis E. Underwood

Abstract

Linear growth, which reflects a child’s general health and well-being, is influenced by a host of organic and psychological factors. Assessment of growth at regular intervals, therefore, is one of the best methods available for detecting disease. The purposes of this chapter are to describe the process of normal growth, to outline the elements of a growth evaluation, and to provide an overview of some of the causes of growth retardation.

Keywords

Carbohydrate Leukemia Glucocorticoid Androgen Hypoglycemia 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patricia A. Rieser
  • Louis E. Underwood

There are no affiliations available

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