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Robot Accidents

  • B. S. Dhillon
Chapter
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Abstract

An accident is an undesired and unplanned event, and there is hardly a day in which the news media does not report accidents. These reported accidents are generally major and the minor ones never get reported. Each year thousands of lives are lost and disabling injuries occur through work-related and other accidents. For example, in the United States alone approximately 2,200,000 disabling work injuries occurred in 1980. Out of this total, approximately 13,000 were fatal and 80,000 led to some kind of permanent impairment [1]. A breakdown of the injuries to eyes, head, arms, trunk, hands, fingers, legs, feet, and toes were 110,000, 130,000, 200,000, 640,000, 150,000, 330,000, 290,000, 110,000, and 40,000, respectively. The figure for injuries of a general nature was 200,000.

Keywords

Robot System Industrial Robot Fault Tree Savannah River Site Occupational Accident 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. S. Dhillon
    • 1
  1. 1.Engineering Management Programme Faculty of EngineeringUniversity of OttawaOttawaCanada

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