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Determination of Riceland Mosquito Population Dynamics

  • C. Lamar Meek
  • Jimmy K. Olson
Part of the Springer Series in Experimental Entomology book series (SSEXP)

Abstract

As is the case for IPM (integrated pest management) programs directed against other insect pests associated with riceland agroecosystems in the United States, the success of programs organized for the control of mosquito populations emanating from these agricultural wetland habitats is predicated by the employment of accurate, efficient monitoring methods. Insight as to the variety of mosquito sampling and population monitoring techniques that have been developed over the past 40 to 50 years can be gained by reviewing Service (1976). Discussed below are the monitoring techniques which have been found by research and operational personnel to be the most applicable or suitable for use specifically in the study and control of mosquitoes associated with riceland agroecosystems.

Keywords

Rice Field Mosquito Species Light Trap Mosquito Population Adult Mosquito 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Lamar Meek
  • Jimmy K. Olson

There are no affiliations available

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